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I got your Letter, and the Birds—
The Maples never knew that you were coming—

— Emily Dickinson, from “[1320]” (via proustitute)

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bremser:

Anri Sala, No Barragan no cry, 2002

bremser:

Anri Sala, No Barragan no cry, 2002

Chat

Is it possible to describe Human Beings with Mathematics?

isomorphisms: I hope that one day people will figure out the "perfect formula" for a constitution (balanced incentives / structure).

gsx002: I doubt it. Formulas belong to the math and logic realm.

isomorphisms: There is some logic to human interactions.

gsx002: That's using the word loosely. :)

isomorphisms: The promise of using maths to describe people is what got me interested in economics. I also do mathpsych.

isomorphisms: This is why I have high hopes for Acemoglu stuff. Also spatial voting theory, game theory, applications to constitutional design.

gsx002: I so have to follow these things more...I used to once upon a time.

gsx002: It's always fascinated me, but I still haven't met a really good Bayesian...and Newcomb's paradox is still tricky for me.

isomorphisms: I'm not saying a currently existing model [like Bayesian rationality]. Just that in theory a correct mathematical model of human behaviour seems (to me) possible.

isomorphisms: Not saying it would be super specific either. The difficulty in convincing people to my point of view is that few people know how loose abstract mathematics is. Cobordisms, homology, homotopy, topology are all very loose. Results in category theory are also quite loose.

isomorphisms: You can construct huge equivalence classes of things. Then you don't distinguish between very different things (famously, a coffee mug and a donut have the same topological equivalence class).

isomorphisms: Some abstract maths (like coalgebras) is actually criticised because "There are no calculations!"

gsx002: Hmm. . . i'd take the opposite bet . . . that there's a proof that there isn't or that there can't be such a model #Gödel

isomorphisms: Gödel is off-topic. His result was about pure maths.

isomorphisms: Even Arrow's Theorem has things fairly nailed down.

gsx002: Tarski then?

isomorphisms: Tarski also unrelated. Says ℝ is fuktup. I agree: especially for economics.

isomorphisms: I actually got Stan Wagon (a Tarski ball scholar) into a discussion on how ℝ is inappropriate for econ.

gsx002: ok, you forced me to bring out the big guns: sartre and camus! "we refuse to be modeled," or something like that :)

isomorphisms: They didn't know how loose abstract mathematics is either. =)

isomorphisms: Lacan thought there were applications of topology to psychoanalysis. Also there's a postmodernist at Ball State who says topology may be an appropriate tool for cultural analysis.

gsx002: I was talking about Tarski's Truth paradox.

isomorphisms: Oh. That's a linguistic problem. We don't have natural language logically figured out yet. However that's not a problem for behavioural modelling.

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padbury:


“And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”This photo shows the collapse of Torrero Alvaro Munera, as he realized in the middle of the his last fight… the injustice to the animal. From that day forward he became an opponent of bullfights.

padbury:

“And suddenly, I looked at the bull. He had this innocence that all animals have in their eyes, and he looked at me with this pleading. It was like a cry for justice, deep down inside of me. I describe it as being like a prayer - because if one confesses, it is hoped, that one is forgiven. I felt like the worst shit on earth.”

This photo shows the collapse of Torrero Alvaro Munera, as he realized in the middle of the his last fight… the injustice to the animal. From that day forward he became an opponent of bullfights.


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This is a problem. Because pink happens when the red and violet sides get together, but they don’t get together — which makes pink an act of wishful thinking, or, to put it bluntly — pink is a made up color.

They Did It To Pluto, But Not To Pink! Please Not Pink! : Krulwich Wonders… : NPR

Pink is real, Science, REAL.

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I’m not denying that both high and low culture need women’s voices, but maybe it’s worth considering that we might want to leave these print dinosaurs to the rapidly-aging crew of men who’ve dominated them since they founded them, and decamp for spaces where there is no shortage of women’s voices. Or, hey, we could stop waiting for their magazines to accept us and start our own!

Living La VIDA Loca (Sorry) | The Awl

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(via &tc / Diane Arbus)

(via &tc / Diane Arbus)

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whitehotel:

Michael van Ofen, Judith (2010)

whitehotel:

Michael van Ofen, Judith (2010)

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Link

Isomorphismes: There is a century-old tree at the end of my street. Right before you...

isomorphismes:

"I’m thinking about my path γ(t) versus the tree’s λ(t). Neither of us can be everywhere at once."

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danchaon:

John Freeman’s poetic review of Stay Awake in The Boston Globe.


"It’s what you carve from a piece of wood that makes it a cello.Scallop more deeply, and you have a viola. Draw a bow over its strings, and the instrument sings through its loss. We have come to think of this sound as beautiful, and it is: a vibration passing through what is missing.”

danchaon:

John Freeman’s poetic review of Stay Awake in The Boston Globe.

"It’s what you carve from a piece of wood that makes it a cello.

Scallop more deeply, and you have a viola. Draw a bow over its strings, and the instrument sings through its loss. We have come to think of this sound as beautiful, and it is: a vibration passing through what is missing.”

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alecshao:

Oscar Santillan, Daybreak
(Paint scraped off of the wall and dusted onto the ground)

alecshao:

Oscar Santillan, Daybreak

(Paint scraped off of the wall and dusted onto the ground)

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weinventyou:

camouflage (2 of 2)

weinventyou:

camouflage (2 of 2)

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tsquad:

Morris Louis, Alpha-Pi, 1960
cavetocanvas:

Morris Louis, Alpha-Pi, 1960
From the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History:

After a visit to New York in April 1953, where they saw the recent paintings of Helen Frankenthaler, Washington-based friends Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland began to similarly stain raw canvases with diluted pigment, rather than apply it with a brush. Experimenting with different painting techniques and media, compositional formats and canvas sizes in the nine remaining years before his untimely death (from lung cancer), Louis produced an astonishingly large body of work. These paintings are divided into three basic series: the Veils (1954–60), the Unfurleds (summer 1960–January/February 1961), and the Stripes (January/February 1961–summer 1962).
Alpha-Pi is one of about 150 Unfurleds he created, generally on mural-size canvases (this one measures over 8 feet by 14 feet). In all of them, irregular rivulets of different colors flow diagonally down toward the lower center of the canvas, but never quite meet; the center of the unprimed canvas remains blank. Heavily diluted, the poured colors soak into the canvas, becoming one with the surface, and maintain the flatness of the modern picture plane. Color retains its optical purity (since it is not used to describe or define something else) and there is no sense of narrative, image, or perspectival space as in traditional painting. Eschewing illusionistic references, the artist forces the viewer to focus solely on the painting’s formal elements—color, size, and shape and the vibrant, light-filled space they inhabit.

tsquad:

Morris Louis, Alpha-Pi, 1960

cavetocanvas:

Morris Louis, Alpha-Pi, 1960

From the Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History:

After a visit to New York in April 1953, where they saw the recent paintings of Helen Frankenthaler, Washington-based friends Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland began to similarly stain raw canvases with diluted pigment, rather than apply it with a brush. Experimenting with different painting techniques and media, compositional formats and canvas sizes in the nine remaining years before his untimely death (from lung cancer), Louis produced an astonishingly large body of work. These paintings are divided into three basic series: the Veils (1954–60), the Unfurleds (summer 1960–January/February 1961), and the Stripes (January/February 1961–summer 1962).

Alpha-Pi is one of about 150 Unfurleds he created, generally on mural-size canvases (this one measures over 8 feet by 14 feet). In all of them, irregular rivulets of different colors flow diagonally down toward the lower center of the canvas, but never quite meet; the center of the unprimed canvas remains blank. Heavily diluted, the poured colors soak into the canvas, becoming one with the surface, and maintain the flatness of the modern picture plane. Color retains its optical purity (since it is not used to describe or define something else) and there is no sense of narrative, image, or perspectival space as in traditional painting. Eschewing illusionistic references, the artist forces the viewer to focus solely on the painting’s formal elements—color, size, and shape and the vibrant, light-filled space they inhabit.
Palladium by Anarchei