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hossdistracted:

Tonight! You and me in the waiting room of an empty medical office. https://www.facebook.com/events/144995949026173/

hossdistracted:

Tonight! You and me in the waiting room of an empty medical office. https://www.facebook.com/events/144995949026173/

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bukowskeet:

Candy Chang - Sidewalk Psychiatry (2008)

bukowskeet:

Candy Chang - Sidewalk Psychiatry (2008)

bukowskeet:

Candy Chang - Sidewalk Psychiatry (2008)

bukowskeet:

Candy Chang - Sidewalk Psychiatry (2008)

bukowskeet:

Candy Chang - Sidewalk Psychiatry (2008)

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Grammar with David Foster Wallace

thessaly:

You have been entrusted to feed your neighbor’s dog for a week while he (the neighbor) is out of town. The neighbor returns home; something has gone awry; you are questioned.

“I fed the dog.”

“Did you feed the parakeet?”

“I fed only the dog.” 

“Did anyone else feed the dog?”

Only I fed the dog.”

“Did you fondle/molest the dog?”

“I only fed the dog!” 

From D. T. Max’s biography of David Foster Wallace, Every Love Story is a Ghost Story

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(via \\ PATTERNITY ///)

(via \\ PATTERNITY ///)

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Emily Dickinson grabbed every conceivable scrap of paper for her stationary. She wrote poems on the backs of party invitations, bills, recipes, shopping lists, food wrappers(think the chocolate bar wrapper made famous by Joseph Cornell) — the kinds of paper that seem to “grow” on any kitchen counter. She’d use these scraps to capture a poetic idea that had skidded into the imagination. When my hands are busy grating nutmeg or scrubbing the stove my mind roams broadly and I receive what feel like “gifts” of ideas (Buddhists would call that “naturally occurring wisdom”). In Emily’s case, what rose up might be a great poem. So she gathered up even those fragments of ideas for poems and jotted them on the backs of those fragments of paper collecting by her pantry board.

Gathering up the Fragments: Recipe Poems by Emily Dickinson « Four Pounds Flour

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Thinking about the relation of comedy to prose fiction, he says that the best jokes and the best short stories both leave out important information but evoke it “in such a way as to cause a kind of explosion of associative connections.”

David Foster Wallace and the Comedy Nerd | Splitsider

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List of Artworks Destroyed in the 9/11 World Trade Center Attack / wtc (via wtc | HTMLGIANT)

List of Artworks Destroyed in the 9/11 World Trade Center Attack / wtc (via wtc | HTMLGIANT)

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visual-poetry:

“this is a poem” by gastão de magalhães (1975)

visual-poetry:

“this is a poem” by gastão de magalhães (1975)

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lake shawnee amusement park

lake shawnee amusement park

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He proposes “that art is a form of communication that co-evolves with its evaluation.” Take Mozart: he transformed the formulas of classical music so skillfully that he changed the musical tastes of his audience. In turn, as Mozart’s patrons flocked to his concertos and operas, they influenced his compositions. The result was “an ongoing aesthetic process which is the co-evolution or the historical entrainment of production and evaluation.” Art is, Prum says, “a kind of dance.”

Yale Alumni Magazine: ornithologist Richard Prum (Nov/Dec 2011)

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A billion stars in one image. We’ve seen some pretty beautiful images of stars, novas, and dust before, but, for the first time ever, science has squeezed that many stars into one shot. And in science, firsts count. To get all those stars, researchers had to combine infra-red images from two different telescopes located in different hemispheres. You’re looking at the Milky Way galaxy’s plane, by the way. Vast, isn’t it? “This incredible image gives us a new perspective of our galaxy, and illustrates the far-reaching discoveries we can make from large sky surveys,” agrees researcher Dr Nick Cross. (via One Billion Stars; A New High for Autism Diagnoses - Technology - The Atlantic Wire)

A billion stars in one image. We’ve seen some pretty beautiful images of stars, novas, and dust before, but, for the first time ever, science has squeezed that many stars into one shot. And in science, firsts count. To get all those stars, researchers had to combine infra-red images from two different telescopes located in different hemispheres. You’re looking at the Milky Way galaxy’s plane, by the way. Vast, isn’t it? “This incredible image gives us a new perspective of our galaxy, and illustrates the far-reaching discoveries we can make from large sky surveys,” agrees researcher Dr Nick Cross. (via One Billion Stars; A New High for Autism Diagnoses - Technology - The Atlantic Wire)

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